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New Center for African American Heritage to Open

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Jen Wallace
Jen Wallace is the Communications guru at the Delaware Historical Society. The Society is comprised of the Delaware History Museum, the Center for African American Heritage, a Research Library, and Old Town Hall, which are all located on Market St. in Wilmington, as well as the Read House & Gardens, a historic house museum in Old New Castle. You can get in touch with Jen at jwallace@dehistory.org.

Wilmington’s Market Street will experience something exciting this fall – the grand re-opening of the newly-improved Wilmington campus of the Delaware Historical Society. The Delaware Historical Society (DHS) will reveal to the public for the first time the new Center for African American Heritage when it opens its doors on October 1. In fact, the DHS is throwing a historic block party and open house that day to welcome visitors.

At the core of the newly renovated space is the innovative exhibition, Delaware: One State, Many Stories, which documents many well-known aspects of our state’s history as well as stories that will be entirely new to most visitors, whether they are native Delawareans or newcomers to the state.

83.13.336 Buttonwood School, New Castle, 1935
Buttonwood School, New Castle, 1935

Among the new features visitors can expect is Journey to Selfhood, the centerpiece of the Center for African American Heritage. One highlight is this photograph of children at the Buttonwood School in New Castle, which is one of 89 schools that P.S. du Pont built for Delaware’s African American students during the 1920s. Also included among the featured artifacts are a desk from the Buttonwood School and the doors from the Mt. Olive School in Kent County, both of which were built with funding from P.S. du Pont, a passionate advocate for improved education.

Visit Journey to Selfhood at the new Center for African American Heritage to learn more about the African American struggle for access to education in the state, including Delaware’s key role in the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision.

Make certain to join us on October 1, 2016 from 10 am – 4pm for an event-filled block party on Market Street between 5th and 6th streets to commemorate the grand opening. Visit the museum and enjoy food from Rolling Revolution food trucks and ice cream from the University of Delaware’s Moo Mobile, performances by Sussex Tech’s “Raven Nation” Marching Band, the Twin Poets, the D Sharps acapella group from the University of Delaware, face painting by the Juggling Hoffmans and much more!

This article, contributed by the Delaware Historical Society, is sponsored content.

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