41.3 F
Delaware
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

Why I Went to Federal Court Last Week…

Must Read

Carney’s State of the State: We’re going to keep on keeping on

Among other things, the governor said he wants governments to keep livestream meetings to give the public greater access.

Millcreek neighborhoods win some battles for safer pathways, but want more

The group wants paths that allow them to walk or bike to parks, schools, recreation areas, historical sites, places of worship, employers and businesses.

Delaware Live individual wrestling rankings

Delaware Live individual high school wrestling rankings
Ken Grant
Ken Grant
Ken Grant has spent most of his life in Delaware, loves being in all three counties, works for the only U.S.-based manufacturer of Thin Layer Chromatography Plates, is married to an incredible woman who is willing to put up with his antics and is the father of two teenagers who have agreed to wait at least another 20 years before writing the books about their “adventurous” childhood.

Last week, for the second time this year, I found myself sitting in a courtroom in the middle of the J. Caleb Boggs Federal Building in Wilmington, shedding a few tears along with the judges, attorneys, officers, and other members of the community.

We were there to witness a very special graduation ceremony.

You see, the U.S. District Court here in Delaware recently started a program where the men and women transitioning from Federal Prison life to civilian life are given the opportunity to accelerate that transition. Normally, these individuals spend three years on probation, but they have the opportunity to take on classes, offer community service, and obtain employment to reduce that time of probation by a year (it’s a pretty rigorous program, there’s a lot more to it than I have written here).

What’s truly inspiring is seeing how the men and women in the Federal Probation Office and the District Court become essential parts of the support system for these individuals as they apply themselves to the program. They work together as a team, along with family members, employers, and community leaders.

It is through these efforts that we see lives changed, families strengthened, and communities restored.

Here’s Chief U.S. Probation Officer John Selvaggi talking about how important this program is to public safety and strong communities.

If you know anyone involved with this program, from the judges to the probation officers to employers to community leaders to family members to former offenders – I hope you’ll take a moment to thank them for their hard work.

We are a community and we’re all in this together.


- Thank you to our sponsor -
- Thank you to our sponsor -
- Thank you to our sponsor -

Latest News

Carney’s State of the State: We’re going to keep on keeping on

Among other things, the governor said he wants governments to keep livestream meetings to give the public greater access.

Millcreek neighborhoods win some battles for safer pathways, but want more

The group wants paths that allow them to walk or bike to parks, schools, recreation areas, historical sites, places of worship, employers and businesses.

Delaware Live individual wrestling rankings

Delaware Live individual high school wrestling rankings
- Thank you to our sponsor -
- Thank you to our sponsor -

More Articles Like This