37.6 F
Delaware
Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Big Steps for Small Fish

Must Read

State pleads for patience as it tries to get vaccine into as many arms as possible

  With COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations decreasing and vaccinations increasing, Delaware now faces the crisis of not having enough vaccinations...

Republican react to Carney’s State of the State: Where’s the beef, John?

The lawmakers said they wanted Carney to issue an action plan for coping with state woes, and they didn't hear it.

Carney’s State of the State: We’re going to keep on keeping on

Among other things, the governor said he wants governments to keep livestream meetings to give the public greater access.
Avatar
Parthena Moisiadis
Parthena Moisiadis is a 2011 graduate of Wilmington Friends School and a student at the University of Pittsburgh studying English Writing and Communication.

Sporting water shoes and baseball caps, nearly a dozen Wilmington Friends students gathered on the rocky shore of the Brandywine River this past Saturday morning and released shad fry into the water.

Many years ago, the small fish sustained George Washington’s troops, serving as a plentiful food source, but over generations, the shad population has decreased tremendously. As a result of the industrial revolution and the implementation of dams, few fish now have the ability to migrate.

As part of the program Shad in Schools, seventh-grade science teacher Karen Horikawa raises shad in her classroom, both for educational and restorative purposes. Prior to receiving the shad eggs, students learn about the cultural, historic and biological significance of the fish. Once the shad eggs arrive, Ms. Horikawa’s seventh grade students have the opportunity to observe and care for the soon-to-be fry, cleaning the aquarium and testing the water quality.

Student Katy Shannon said that she enjoyed the active role she had in raising the shad fry. “It was much more fun than studying from a book,” she said.

Due to their small size, shad fry are difficult to identify with the naked eye, so students used microscopes to better observe the fish.

“That was really interesting for me to see them moving around because I want to be a marine biologist,” said Kate Horan, another of Ms. Horikawa’s students.

On the morning of the highly-anticipated release, Ms. Horikawa and the students distributed the fry among plastic cups and eased them into the river.

The shad will head to the ocean to spawn and return to the Brandywine River again this time next year.

“It’s amazing how they know the river and return every year,” Ms. Horikawa.

Just like the shad, I plan to return every year for the release. A classmate and I originally proposed the idea of implementing a program like this, and Ms. Horikawa has successfully carried out this project three years in a row. Not only has she educated students, but the annual release is an important measure in restoring native fish to the Brandywine.

Parthena Moisiadis is a 2011 graduate of Wilmington Friends School and a student at the University of Pittsburgh studying English Writing and Communication.


- Thank you to our sponsor -
- Thank you to our sponsor -
- Thank you to our sponsor -

Latest News

State pleads for patience as it tries to get vaccine into as many arms as possible

  With COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations decreasing and vaccinations increasing, Delaware now faces the crisis of not having enough vaccinations...

Republican react to Carney’s State of the State: Where’s the beef, John?

The lawmakers said they wanted Carney to issue an action plan for coping with state woes, and they didn't hear it.

Carney’s State of the State: We’re going to keep on keeping on

Among other things, the governor said he wants governments to keep livestream meetings to give the public greater access.
- Thank you to our sponsor -
- Thank you to our sponsor -

More Articles Like This